MLK’s Niece Responds to NAACP’s Claim ‘Anthem is Racist’

The niece of civil rights activist Martin Luther King Jr. is responding to claims from the NAACP that the Star Spangled Banner is “racist.”

Many liberals are now calling for the anthem to be scrapped.

Ms. King says no way, the anthem is what heals our nation.

The niece of civil rights leader Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. said that the California NAACP is looking in the wrong place if it thinks scrapping “The Star-Spangled Banner” as America’s national anthem will heal the nation.

NAACP president Alice Huffman has said that the national anthem is “racist; it doesn’t represent our community, it’s anti-black.”

As a result, the California NAACP is trying to get states and Congress behind its resolution to scrap “one of the most racist, pro-slavery, anti-black songs in the American lexicon.”

Alveda King said the answer to America’s divisions is not in destroying traditions.

“It’s not the song. It’s not the flags. It’s not the Confederate statues. But it’s our hearts,” Alveda King said Saturday on “Fox & Friends Weekend.”

“We need a transformation of the heart,” she added.

King said that the words of a stanza few people ever sing are not the issue.

“I hope they realize it’s more than the song,” King said of the NAACP, saying that little results if the song is changed “without changing the hearts of the people.”

On Saturday, she reminded America that Martin Luther King would urge his followers, “we must learn to live together as brothers or perish as fools.”

“We can burn our whole country down — and please don’t do it,” she said. “Our hearts need to be transformed.”

Alveda King has said that it is possible to air differences and remain respectful.

“We can protest peacefully and still respect our flag, our national anthem and even kneel down to the statues and memorial fights that we are having,” she said in September in discussing the NFL’s national anthem protests.

“We need to step back, take a breather. That’s what taking the knee can help you do. My daddy A.D. King, my uncle Martin Luther King Jr. in the 1960s took the knee, however they were actually praying,” she said.

“We do have to have respect for our flag for our anthem, and we really have to care about each other. Now the things that they want to protest for, I agree,” she said.

Commentator Todd Starnes said that groups like the California NAACP are not out to create, but to destroy.

“The folks who are waging war on American traditions and history won’t be content until they’ve bulldozed over every symbol of our great nation,” he wrote recently.

“If the NAACP is successful the question becomes who will be tasked with writing a new national anthem?” Starnes wrote. “Beyonce? Fifty Cent? Colin Kaepernick?”

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Sources: Western Journalism and Truthfeed

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