Top Choices to Replace Disgraced McConnell

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is an epic failure.

He’s symbolic of everything that’s wrong with D.C.

He’s a wimpy leader, unable to command his troops and get the job done.

Then, to make matters worse, after failing, he blames “high expectations” for the inability to accomplish anything. (as if to suggest a lowered bar is the key to success.)

That’s the crappy Washington mindset that got us in this mess to begin with.

He needs to go and the sooner the better.

Below are 6 top choices for his replacement.

Should Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell step down from the top position in Congress, Republicans will be looking for someone savvy enough to accomplish a difficult legislative to-do list and trusted by the president.

President Donald Trump has not held back in his repeated criticisms of McConnell. Trump blames him for failing to repeal Obamacare in the first six months that Republicans controlled both the Congress and the presidency.

A Senate majority leader under Trump has a difficult job of working to pass complex legislation, including Obamacare repeal, immigration reform, tax reform and a massive infrastructure spending bill, in a sharply-divided chamber with a slight majority. All without attracting the ire of the commander in chief.

John Cornyn

As the number two in GOP Senate leadership, current Majority Whip Sen. John Cornyn would be the obvious replacement for McConnell.

He’s known for taking tough jobs that other senators don’t want and even told Politico in March that the majority leadership position is “something I would be interested in doing.”

Thad Cochran

As the second most senior Republican in the Senate, Sen. Thad Cochran of Mississippi holds a commanding position in the body. He chairs the largest Senate committee, the Committee on Appropriations, overseeing 12 subcommittees.

Orrin Hatch

Utah Sen. Orrin Hatch is one of the most senior Republicans, and the second most senior senator in the chamber. While he considered retiring in 2018, he decided to stay to help Trump fight against the ingrained Washington establishment.

Trump was even influential in convincing Hatch to not retire after four decades in the Senate. “His pitch is he needs me,” Hatch said of Trump in March. “Things are going to be just fine.”

Chuck Grassley

Iowa Sen. Chuck Grassley has been in the Senate since 1981. He’s proved adept at attracting co-sponsors on his bills and resolutions, ranking third highest for that particular skill in 2015, according to GovTrack.

The Senate leadership position isn’t about being popular. It’s about wrangling votes, building coalitions, and understanding unique Senate rules to accomplish one’s objectives. A deep understanding of how committees’ work goes a long way.

Shelley Capito

Having the support of Trump may not be as important as having the respect senators representing Trump supporters, but West Virginia Sen. Shelley Capito has both.

John Barrasso

Wyoming Sen. John Barrasso is a relatively new senator (he was elected in 2006), but in his tenure, he’s served on an impressive number of committees. He now chairs the Committee on the Environment and Public Works and leads the Senate Republican Policy Committee.

Sources: Daily Caller and Truthfeed

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